Storm Surge 2013 (@GEESology mini-series) : Part 4 – Spurn

The four part mini-series, looking back over a year since the 5 December 2013 storm surge which struck the east coast of the UK, has reached its conclusion this week. Instead of looking back at the events of that night, Part 4 looks at the future for the Humber estuary, and particular Spurn, given the damage that was done.

“Storm Surge 2013 : One Year On – Part Four : Spurn

by @cloudskinner

This is the fourth and final installment of our mini-series looking back over the year since the 5 December 2013 storm surge, which flooded many areas in the Humber Estuary and along the east coast of the UK. The first part, Modelling the Surge, looked at the research that has been conducted since the storm surge and has advanced our knowledge and understanding of these events in the Humber. Part Two, What we Learnt, focused on the 2014 Humber Conference and the lessons that have been learnt over the year. Last week guest blogger, Jazmin Scarlett, told us about some of the often unseen impacts of flooding, the mental health issues that can arise, and howcommunities band together after disasters.

For the final part I want to take a longer look into the future and try and predict what it has in store for Spurn. Spurn, or Spurn Point as it is commonly known, is a piece of land that resembles a spit, sweeping out from the edge of the Holderness Coast and round into the estuary…”

Read the full post here

With the conclusion of the mini-series, the GEESology blog turns its attention to International Women’s Week, and will profile some of the influential women in the fields of GEES. You can keep up to date with the blog on Twitter.

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